2012 Nissan Juke-R Review

2012 Nissan Juke-R Review

What will you get when you cross a Nissan GT-R with a Juke? A menacing Juke-R. A crossover that employs racing components from the Nissan GT-R. Incredibly, the automaker surprises us every year by upping the ante with the GT-R’s engine performance, now it comes with a unique and bold concept – a Juke with racing standards – only to taunt our senses. A super-crossover by design, only two to be produced – one right handed and one with left-hand drive – to gauge reactions of the crowd.

Nissan Juke-R Features

Exterior

Not so different from the already largest selling Mini SUV in Europe – the Juke – after just a year on sale, the Juke-R has tweaks comparable to a racing model. For one it has to accommodate the Nissan GT-R power train underneath and 20 inch RAYS forged alloy wheels, hence the flared wheel arches.

Exterior

An array of large circular vents in the front bumper and fine ducts on the bonnet provide enough air cooling for the twin-turbocharged V6 engine. The back employs a split rear wing that provides the required down force and a new rear bumper with aerodynamic diffuser for the Juke to stay on ground. And two pentagonal exhausts bring out the car’s angry roar.

Interior

Totally transformed from the usual Juke’s interior to a conventional supercar, the Juke-R sports GT-R’s steering wheel, dials and pedals along with racing seats with five-point safety harnesses and a race spec roll cage for additional rigidity and safety.

Interior

Keeping the same console bearing semblance to a motorcycle fuel-tank, rest of the interior has been modified to accommodate the race specific add-ons with a 7-inch LCD touch screen driver interface adorning the centre, which displays all gauges. Other transfers from the GT-R are the Sat Nav and the Entertainment system.

Performance Systems

An online performance stat calculator predicted a spectacular 3.6 second shoot from Zero to 60 miles per hour; 11.44 seconds to cover a quarter mile and a 124 mph top speed with the new 480 hp engine. If however, the Juke-R is lighter than the assumed weight of 3200 lbs of the Juke for the test, the numbers may go down.

Performance Systems

Juke-R is indeed powered by the GT-R’s 3.8L V6 engine instead of its standard 1.6L inline, the car literally built around the engine. And not just the engine, the Juke-R is practically stitched together with GT-R’s components: the drive train, its four-wheel drive controller and its racing suspension system.

However, the major difference between the legendary supercar and the seemingly crossbred SUV is the wheelbase. The Juke’s wheelbase, being 250 mm shorter than the GT-R, the team at RML had to install shorter prop shafts while making sure they don’t give away under intense torsional activity yet maintaining GT-R’s exceptional handling capability.

Juke’s wheelbase

A load of technological transfers have been done on the city car to deliver the aggressive power and the superb handling synonymous to the GT-R. It houses the GT-R’s 4WD controller that maintains the car’s traction control, stability system and more importantly the torque vectoring system, which gives better grip and balance helping it to cut corners faster.

To fit such technological add-ons, Juke’s entire floor panel was removed and the whole thing was rebuilt from the ground up. The driving experience of the Juke-R will be just as dynamic as the GT-R’s.

Nissan teamed up with UK based RML group for building this work of art along with inputs from Nissan Technology Centre for Europe (NTC-E). Testing is to begin November this year, before it blasts its way through city streets. The new Juke-R is not yet a production car, but a fully road legal concept. Pricing and launch date to be revealed later.